Faculty Tips Archives - April 2014

  • Diane Phillips, Ph.D.

    The Influence of "Laudato si" on Sustainability in the U.S.

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    Diane Phillips, Ph.D., professor of marketing at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, is available to comment on Pope Francis’s anticipated climate change encyclical, “Laudato si,” (Praised Be).


  • Stephanie Tryce, Ph.D.

    From the World Cup to the World’s Stage: The Future of Women’s Soccer

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    On Sunday, July 5, the United States women’s soccer team defeated Japan 5-2 in the 2015 FIFA World Cup – the most watched soccer game in U.S. history, with 25 million viewers. A media onslaught and a nationwide social media celebration featuring celebrities, athletes and politicians, has continued since then, raising the questions – how long will the hype last, and could this be a turning point for women’s sports?


  • Pope Francis and Catholic Philadelphia

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    Katie Oxx, Ph.D., assistant professor of theology, discusses a brief history of Catholicism in Philadelphia and shares her thoughts on how it will inform Pope Francis' visit.


  • "Laudato si" is a Call for Justice

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    Associate Professor of Biology Clint Springer, Ph.D., comments on Pope Francis's encyclical, "Laudato si."


  • Pope Francis and Servant Leadership

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    In advance of Pope Francis’s scheduled visit to Philadelphia during the World Meeting of Families, September 22-27, 2015, Saint Joseph's University experts are sharing their thoughts on a variety of subjects related to Pope Francis and the papacy. In this video, Ronald Dufresne Ph.D., associate professor of management, explores Pope Francis' example of servant leadership. Dufresne, along with SJU colleagues Karin Botto and E.


  • Solomon

    All Work and No Play? The Impact of Gamification on ‘Traditional’ Industries

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    What do filling out insurance forms, applying for a mortgage, registering for healthcare benefits, completing data entry, or working with thousands of lines of code have in common with playing video games? Perhaps more than you’d think, thanks to a hot trend called “gamification.”


  • Pope Francis as Pastor

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    In advance of Pope Francis’s scheduled visit to Philadelphia during the World Meeting of Families, September 22-27, 2015, Saint Joseph's University experts are sharing their thoughts on a variety of subjects related to Pope Francis and the papacy. In this video, William Madges, Ph.D., professor of theology and religious studies, discusses Francis in the context of his two immediate predecessors.


  • Dennis G. Raible, C.P.A., visiting professor of accounting

    The Trickiest Tax Season Yet: Advice from an Expert

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    “Every year, changes are made to the tax code and annual renewals of proposed deductions or credits,” explains Dennis G. Raible, C.P.A., visiting professor of accounting at Saint Joseph’s University. But this year, a few things will make filing more complicated.


  • Brands Pump Up Fans With Kickoff of Super Bowl Ads

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    This Sunday the country’s largest sporting event and one of the most-watched nights of television will have fans glued to their flat screens. But it’s not just the “Big Game” that fans are anticipating – it’s also the commercials.


  • Scholars and Experts Available to Comment on Pope Francis, Papal Visit

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    The following Saint Joseph’s University faculty and administrators — renowned theologians, scholars and experts — are available to comment on various topics relating to Pope Francis’s scheduled visit to Philadelphia during the World Meeting of Families, September 22-27, 2015.


  • Cuban Youth Hope for ‘Greater Private Property and Market-Based Activities’

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    Cuba scholar Richard Gioioso, Ph.D., assistant professor of political science, comments on the historic normalization of U.S.-Cuba relations. An expert in Cuban migration and Cuban youth, whom Gioioso calls “expressly apolitical,” he adds that his research suggests “many Cuban young people would like to see some sort of political change in their country...


  • Supporting Disabled Veterans in Developing Civilian Careers

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    On Oct. 5, President Obama dedicated the American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial, honoring current and former military members who have suffered while serving their country. In his speech, the president emphasized the country’s duty to care for veterans, saying, “When our wounded veterans set out on that long road of recovery, we need to move heaven and earth to make sure they get every single benefit, every single bit of care that they have earned, that they deserve.”


  • Taking on the Holidays: The Challenge for Interfaith Families

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    With the start of every winter holiday season come the mainstays of American Christmas: the toy commercials, 24-hour holiday radio stations, Christmas trees and photos with Santa. Amidst it all, families of minority cultures and religions often struggle to establish themselves in the pervasiveness of secularized Christmas.


  • Medical Microbiologist Comments on Mutating Ebola Virus

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    While the numbers surrounding the Ebola epidemic in West Africa are scary enough — the death toll is nearing 5,000, and a possible infection rate of 50,000 has been forecast — mutation, a single word, may be more worrisome to many than all of the virus's epidemiological statistics put together.


  • Of Saints and Popes: the Canonizations of John XXIII and John Paul II

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    On April 27, for the first time in history, two Roman Catholic popes will be canonized on the same day: Pope John XXIII and Pope John Paul II will be elevated to sainthood in St. Peter’s Cathedral in Rome, joining the 10,000 saints who are recognized in church documents.


  • Super Bowl Ads Score with Popular Music

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    It's the perennial question asked each year during Super Bowl season.

    Does humor sell? Is it the ad with the coolest celebrity? Or, is popular music driving the success of your favorite Super Bowl commercial?


  • Olympic Jitters: Making Sense of the Terrorist Threat in Russia

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    Recent headlines have introduced us to Ruzana Ibragimova, a potential terrorist from Dagestan, who, along with other militants, seeks to instill fear and embarrass President Vladimir Putin at the Sochi Olympic Games. According to Russia expert Lisa Baglione, Ph.D., chair and professor of political science, this violence has its roots in the two-decades-old conflict between Russia and Chechnya, which, like Dagestan, is a federal subject of Russia located in the North Caucasus.


  • Color Christmas Red and Green-er

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    While choosing a real or artificial tree ultimately often depends on lifestyle, overall, buying a real Christmas tree is a great way for an average person to make a positive difference in terms of climate change, according to plant biologist Clint Springer, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology.


  • Religious and Generational Diversity in the Workplace

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    Four generations of people now exist in the workplace: the Traditionalist Generation, Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y/Millennials. When it comes to celebrating religious holidays and sharing spirtiual benefits, this co-inhabitance can create challanges in a professional environment.


  • Lincoln at Gettysburg

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    In this video, Civil War scholar Randall Miller, Ph.D., professor of history, discusses the effect Lincoln’s own visit to the battlefield and the grave sites had on him, as he completed the draft of the speech that day 150 years ago.


  • JFK: Legacy and Image

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    According to Francis Graham Lee, Ph.D., professor of political science, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963, in Dallas, Texas, is one of the defining events of 20th century America. In this video, Lee discusses Kennedy’s lasting legacy for his and subsequent presidencies: “It’s image,” Lee says.


  • Facing Our Fears: How Horror Helps

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    This month, scores of Americans will enter the darkened realms of theatrical haunted houses, nighttime hayrides and horror film marathons where monsters, ghosts and pop-culture urban legends wait to give them a scare. A popular Halloween tradition, these dramatized attractions, coupled with costumes, trick-or-treat candy and festive decorations added up to an estimated $7 billion in 2011.


  • Preventing “Fall Back” Setbacks in Children’s Sleep

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    What’s not to love about an extra hour of sleep? Just ask any parent and they’ll tell you how that one little hour that gets added every fall as part of Daylight Savings Time can wreak havoc on their children’s routines.

    According to Jodi Mindell, Ph.D., sleep expert and professor of psychology at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, there’s plenty that parents can do to be proactive before we “fall back” on November 3.


  • Research Says Mobile Grocery Apps Fall Short of Potential

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    Consumers have turned to mobile applications to meet a variety of needs. But when it comes to the grocery store, shoppers are somewhat disappointed with current options according to research by Nancy M. Childs, Ph.D., Gerald E. Peck Fellow and professor of food marketing at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia.


  • Beyond the Field of Your Dreams: Careers in the Sports Industry Abound

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    For those who have a strong interest in sports, the news is good. Beyond the privileged few who wear jerseys with numbers on their backs as pro athletes, the business of sports offers many opportunities in a wide variety of occupations and organizations according to John Lord, Ph.D., professor of sports marketing.


  • Taking Back the Yard: Dealing with Invasive Plants

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    There’s nothing more frustrating for gardeners than discovering that their well-planned plots or rolling lawns have been infiltrated by invasive plant species, the perennial marauders of the back yard set.


  • Philadelphia and the Battle of Gettysburg

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    There’s no question that the Battle of Gettysburg, fought between the Union’s Grand Army of the Potomac and the Confederacy’s Army of Northern Virginia 150 years ago — July 1-3, 1863 — is one of the great, iconic battles of American military history.


  • The New, Adult Face of Autism

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    As awareness of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) rises, so too have the number of diagnoses — and not just among children. The number of adults who are living with autism is growing rapidly, according to Michelle Rowe, Ph.D., executive director of the Kinney Center for Autism Education and Support at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia.


  • Papal Profiling: Who will be the Next Pontiff?

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    Speculation regarding the profile of the next leader of the Catholic Church is mounting in the days since Pope Benedict XVI’s surprising resignation. William Madges, Ph.D., dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and professor of theology, warns that speculation is just that until the conclave actually meets, but notes some obvious considerations.


  • New Credit Card Surcharge OK for Some, Surprises Others

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    For years, card issuers have been making money off the fees they charge retailers for the convenience of using a credit card at checkout. Beginning Jan. 27, however, retailers are now permitted to pass this cost onto customers in a big way as a U.S. District Court has decided that merchants can add a surcharge of up to 4 percent onto a customer's bill if they pay with a credit card.


  • Popular Music Adds Screen Time to the Big Game

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    What could spark more interest than the Super Bowl XLVII game this year is the eagerly anticipated halftime performance of Grammy Award winner Beyoncé.


  • Catholic Schools Week Arrives Amidst More Changes for Philadelphia Archdiocese

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    As parishes across the region prepare to celebrate Catholic Schools Week, more changes are affecting Catholic education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. New initiatives have recently been announced aimed at reviving Catholic education and ensuring its sustainability.


  • Saint Joseph’s Experts Available to Comment on Pope’s Resignation

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    Pope Benedict XVI made a surprise announcement on Monday, Feb. 11, that he would resign the Holy See on Feb. 28. A new pope will be named after Easter. Saint Joseph’s University experts are available to comment on this historic development.


  • They’re Ba-aack! Coping When College Kids Come Home for the Holidays

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    When he left, he was your child whose meals you prepared and whose laundry you dutifully did.  Now he’s home from college for an extended winter break – possibly bringing with him more laundry for you to do.

    For parents readjusting to life with their college students at home for a few weeks, it can be…an adjustment.


  • Good Deal vs. Good Cause: Meaningful Holiday Shopping

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    Many consumers sacrificed their Thanksgiving dinners this year to grab that ultimate pre-Black Friday deal that they can spend the rest of the season bragging about. But according to Saint Joseph’s University sociologist Keith Brown, Ph.D., more and more shoppers are seeking something greater than saving a buck.

    Brown has been studying what he calls an ethical turn in markets that has consumers looking to make purchases that make an impact, or can even change the world.


  • Mobile Shoppers, an Opportunity for Retail?

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    Consumer shopping patterns this holiday season point to a very clear trend: mobile shopping is increasing in popularity. In the past, mobile and online shopping have been viewed as a threat to traditional brick-and mortar stores, but Brent Smith, Ph.D., associate professor of marketing at Saint Joseph's University, sees an opportunity for retailers to connect with tech-savvy consumers through their mobile devices.


  • Violent Crime Doesn’t Fit in the Autism Puzzle

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    As investigators begin to piece together a profile of Connecticut school massacre gunman Adam Lanza, much is being speculated about his possible Asperger’s Syndrome diagnosis.


  • Not So Fast: Economics and the Election

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    There’s no doubt that the economy is the deciding factor for many voters. Americans are looking to presidential candidates for a fast remedy, but the reality will be far less immediate, according to Saint Joseph’s University economist Benjamin Liebman, Ph.D.


  • Vote This, Not That: Casting a Healthy Ballot

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    For many Americans, health care is a paramount issue when weighing their choices for the presidency, and rightly so. Currently the United States spends nearly $9,000 per capita annually for health care, which far exceeds any other nation in the world.  In addition to that statistic, America has disappointing infant mortality and life expectancy rates when compared to other developed nations. It’s clear to see that Americans have much at stake.


  • Not Humbug: Christmas Trees and Climate Change

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    Given recent extreme weather events – the summer’s brutal heat and subsequent drought, followed by Superstorm Sandy’s disastrous path – newly green-conscious consumers may be wondering how to lessen their carbon footprint this holiday season.


  • Climate Silence and the 2012 Presidential Campaign

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    Though the four debates of the presidential election ignored any talk of policies that could mitigate climate change, Hurricane Sandy’s disastrous path brought the issue front and center during the final week of the campaign.


  • Fiscal Cliff Poses Challenges for Family Businesses

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    The final presidential debate between President Obama and Mitt Romney briefly addressed a topic that Patrick Saparito, Ph.D., assistant professor of management, says has been weighing on the minds of family business owners: the fiscal cliff.


  • Audacious Games: The Future is Redeemed in 'Cloud Atlas'

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    Movie lovers are buzzing about a star-studded film with a dizzying plot that opens Oct. 26. Perhaps one of the most challenging book-to-movie translations to date, Warner Brothers' Cloud Atlas features Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Jim Broadbent, Susan Sarandon and Hugh Grant, and is helmed by A-list directors Lana and Andy Wachowski (The Matrix and V for Vendetta) and Tom Tykwer (Run Lola Run and The International).


  • Presidential Election Headed for a Photo Finish

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    With the 2012 presidential election gearing up for the final weeks of the campaign, it’s inevitable that some voters – particularly those who supported then-Senator Barack Obama four years ago – would compare this cycle to the 2008 election, and might be feeling nostalgic for days gone by.


  • Recession Retail: Big Changes Coming to America's Apparel

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    No segment of the economy has been immune from the economic downturn, but U.S. clothing retailers have had a particularly rough time.

    Now, even as the economy makes its slow climb back, the apparel industry isn’t out of the woods. They’re facing another set of challenges: retaining customers as new competitors with game-changing ideas fight to break into the market.


  • Accounting Debate Illustrates Challenge Over International Standards

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    While many companies worldwide use the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) to determine what’s listed as an asset or liability, the United States is one of the few countries that still uses its own accounting standards (U.S. GAAP).

    Recently, there has been pressure to get a single set of international accounting standards for every company to follow, regardless of where it’s based. But that’s easier said than done.


  • Five Ways to Advance Your Small Business

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    If you don’t know everything you would like to know about how to grow your small business — who are your best customers, what is your most profitable product or service, what’s the best location for your business — you need business intelligence (BI).


  • How Empty Nesters Can Cope with Homesick Students

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    It's natural for first-year students to encounter challenges associated with the transition to college life. For many students the academic demands are great, dorm life may be their first experience sharing a living space, and there is unstructured time to manage. This can also be a difficult transition for parents who feel inclined to comfort their student who is missing home.


  • John Adams: Historical Accuracy And Artistic License

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    HBO's current miniseries "John Adams," which is based on historian David McCullough's Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of the same name, is earning praise from television critics for an historical accuracy and gritty realism that is as close to the real thing as we are able to imagine.


  • Mapping Obama’s Path to Victory

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    Before the election results rolled in late Tuesday night, political analysts across the country were feverishly predicting which states would go blue or red. Now that the dust has settled and the electoral map is clearly painted, those same experts are looking back on the campaigns to analyze how Senator John McCain and President-Elect Barack Obama got where they are today.


  • St. Patrick Loves a Sustainable Parade

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    As the patron saint of all things verdant, it should be no surprise that St. Patrick's eyes would smile at the thought of a truly green – or sustainable – parade in his honor.

    Professor of Biology Michael (Patrick) McCann, Ph.D., associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia, urges organizers of the world's St. Patrick's Day parades to consider the three Rs – reduce, reuse and recycle – when planning their celebrations.


  • "Quality Over Quantity" Remains the Holiday Trend

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    This holiday season consumers are thinking small. So small, in fact, that the space under the Christmas tree may appear a bit empty for some on Christmas morning. However, market researchers are seeing an ongoing trend of quality over quantity, and this holiday season looks to continue that trend.


  • Is the United States Government Broken? -

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    There is no question that the U.S. government is facing its share of troubles. During the worst recession in its history, it is fighting two foreign wars. On top of that, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 9.7 percent of the workforce is unemployed, and despite months of congressional discussion and deal making, a solution to the health care crisis seems far off.


  • Math Anxiety: Dealing with the Problem

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    As children of all ages head back to school, many will be burdened with the added challenge of math anxiety. “It’s a problem that usually starts at an early age, and if it isn’t addressed in grade school, math anxiety can hinder students throughout their education and beyond,” says Agnes Rash, Ph.D., professor of mathematics at Saint Joseph’s University.


  • What's Behind Rising Food Prices, Beyond the U.S. Drought

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    <p>Consumers see buying from area farmers and producers as a good way to keep money and jobs close to home, improving the local economy while protecting American jobs.&nbsp;But does buying local really make a significant economic difference?</p>


  • A Parent’s Guide to the Realities of College Drinking

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    Preparing to send a child to college can be a busy, nerve-wracking and emotional time for parents. They’ve invested much time and energy helping their child decide what college will work best academically and socially. They go shopping to buy all the dorm room essentials. But what most parents don’t spend enough time doing is preparing their child to deal with the reality of college drinking.


  • Naughty or Nice? Online Shopping at Work

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    Cyber Monday and the Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays of online shopping that follow can be frustrating — and expensive — for some employers. But Claire Simmers, Ph.D., co-author of "The Internet and Workplace Transformation," says she has seen a recent shift in corporate attitudes concerning employees who shop online at work.


  • Grammys Honor the Art – Not the Commerce – of Music -

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    Entertainment marketing expert Brent Smith, Ph.D., says that, despite the shift toward more popular music genres, the Grammy Awards should still be taken seriously by viewers as an event where artists are recognized for the quality of their work.

    “To some degree, every brand must stay relevant with mainstream audiences,” says Smith. “Yet, the Grammys still represent the most respected awards show in the music industry because the nominees and winners are elected by their peers.”


  • Beyond the Battlefields: A Greater Understanding of the Civil War

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    April 12 marks the 150th anniversary of the attack on Fort Sumter in the Charleston, S.C., harbor, and signals the beginning of a multi-year commemoration of the United States Civil War (1861-1865). Accordingly, many national Civil War parks and sites – like Fort Sumter, Gettysburg, Pa., and Shiloh, Miss.– are ready to receive a bumper crop of visitors over the next four years, as our nation revisits this time from our history.


  • Pope John Paul II and the Jewish People

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    Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia will host a landmark exhibit chronicling the late Pope John Paul II's life and legacy of improving dialogue between Catholics and Jews. "A Blessing to One Another: Pope John Paul II and the Jewish People," will be at The Kimmel Center free of admission. The exhibit comes to Philadelphia after stops in Cincinnati, Washington, D.C., Pittsburgh, Chicago, and New York.


  • Oil Spill 101: What Have We Learned?

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    Though the recent oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico caused by the BP/Deep Water Horizon oilrig explosion is no longer leading headlines, this fall, the disaster will be a major topic of conversation and study in environmental science classrooms around the country.


  • How to Leverage Social Media in Your Holiday Marketing Campaign

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    With the holiday season fast approaching, Natalie Wood, Ph.D., assistant director of Saint Joseph’s University’s Center for Consumer Research, offers the following strategies for how marketers can be better prepared and leverage the power of social media to strengthen their existing marketing campaign. With the right social media strategy, Wood says marketers can maximize brand exposure at very little cost.


  • Charging for Fast Food Extras May Actually Save You Cash

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    The typical American consumer is accustomed to unwrapping a hamburger from their favorite fast food establishment and finding “the works”: lettuce, tomatoes, pickles and a few packets of ketchup on the side. However, according to John Stanton, Ph.D., chair of food marketing at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, the “frills” that come with fast food or restaurant meals could become a thing of the past.


  • No Nukes? WikiLeaks Roil the Waters of Statecraft

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    The current WikiLeaks saga has many in diplomatic circles either red-faced with embarrassment or laughing up their sleeves at what the cables revealed. International relations expert Lisa Baglione, Ph.D., chair and professor of political science at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, says that in the delicate dance between nuclear proliferation and containment, there is much more at risk than a loss of face.


  • For Future Job Seekers, ‘Tis the Season to Network

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    While students look forward to the holidays as a chance to unwind, 'tis the season to "network before they need work," advises Brett Woodard, director of the Career Development Center at Saint Joseph’s University. Students should use this time purposefully, he says, to "plant seeds" for their career search by deepening existing relationships and expanding their network with new contacts.


  • 12-21-2012: Apocalypse Now, Later or Never?

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    Will the year 2012 spell the end of life on Earth as we know it?

    Columbia Pictures’ upcoming disaster movie 2012 suggests that it will. Based loosely on interpretations of the Mayan long count calendar, which ends its 5,125-year cycle on December 21, 2012, the movie’s trailer features the tagline, “Mankind’s earliest civilization warned us this day was coming.”


  • A Good Night’s Sleep: The Most Important School Supply

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    For kids, the summer months are packed with vacations, camps, week-to-week schedule changes and lots of late nights. It’s no wonder that getting back to the school year routine can be difficult. Returning to regular sleep schedules can be even harder. According to sleep expert and Saint Joseph’s University Professor of Psychology Jodi Mindell, Ph.D., the end of the summer is the time to reset kids’ biological clocks.


  • Sleep Expert Urges Students to Hit the Sack before the School Bells Ring

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    <p>As preparations for a new school year get under way, Saint Joseph&rsquo;s University psychologist and sleep expert Jodi Mindell, Ph.D., reminds parents and kids not to forget the most important school supply of all: sleep.</p>


  • Personal Connectors and Coaches for First-Year Students

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    A program connecting first-year students with non-academic advisors offers a personal connection at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia.  The Connectors Program is a two-year old program at the university partnering incoming students (connectees) with a staff member or administrator (connectors) for the duration of the student’s first academic year.


  • Managing Financial Anxieties During the Holidays

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    With news of a recession, it’s no wonder that many Americans are feeling anxious about their financial situation this holiday season. According to Saint Joseph’s University psychologist Phyllis Anastasio, Ph.D., these anxieties are amplified by constant media reminders.


  • Holiday Season Could Cause Problems at the Workplace

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    The holiday season, with its heavy focus on religion, can spark awkward situations at the work place. This festive time of year has many workers wishing to spruce up their offices with holiday decorations, leaving employers to figure out how to regulate such religious expression.


  • From Main Street to Wall Street

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    Members of the Erivan K. Haub School of Business faculty at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia are available to speak about the financial crisis.


  • Clarence Thomas' "My Grandfather's Son:" Deja Vu All Over Again?

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    The first Monday in October means it's back to work for the highest justices of the land, and the U. S. Supreme Court has already accepted 43 cases for the current term.


  • Health Care Reform A Moral Victory for the U.S.?

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    Despite President Obama’s congressional address on health care, many Americans still lack a true understanding of the proposed changes and what a final bill might look like.

    According to Jack Newhouse, Ph.D., assistant professor of health services at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, it seems that Congress wants the impossible.


  • Satellite Merger: What Will Happen to Radio?

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    The proposed XM/Sirius Satellite radio merger wasn't necessarily a bad day for broadcast radio. David Allan, Ph.D., an entertainment marketing professor at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia, sees the merger as an opportunity for broadcast radio to reestablish its roots by providing more local content.


  • How Winter Snow Will Affect Spring Gardens

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    While beleaguered Americans continued to dig out from record snowfalls, the gardeners among them were secretly thrilled, watching the freezing flakes pile up. “They realized that snow cover can be good for many plants, especially perennial herbs and shrubs, because it provides insulation from freezing temperatures.


  • What Are Secrets Worth in Corporate America?

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    The power of information and secrets lie in their relevance and timeliness. WikiLeaks, the controversial non-profit media organization, which gained notoriety for leaking classified U.S. military files, is believed to be in the process of leaking confidential documents relating to Bank of America and BP. If the leaked information pertains to secrets of strategic relevance to these companies, the corporate competitive landscape could be altered.


  • Nostalgic Ads Evoke Holiday Memories

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    Think you’ve seen that holiday commercial before? That’s because you have – maybe even as long ago as the 1980s. In a move to touch the nostalgic hearts of consumers this holiday season, businesses like Toys R Us are recycling the old in order to captivate younger audiences and remind their parents of times past.


  • How to Manage Generational Clash in the Workplace

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    You’re on vacation in the Bahamas and your colleague e-mails you a question about the report she is scheduled to present to the board later that day. With your Blackberry close at hand, you quickly answer her message and get back to your hot rock massage.


  • Six Ways to Avoid Freshman Fallout

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    It's natural for first-year students to encounter challenges associated with the transition to college life. For many students the academic demands are great, dorm-life may be their first experience sharing a living space, and there is so much unstructured time to manage.

    As director of Saint Joseph's University's Office for Student Success, Kim Allen-Stuck, Ph.D., has some advice to help students ease into the college experience.

    1)Manage your expectations


  • New School Year, New School: Helping Kids Cope with Catholic School Restructuring

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    <p>Although many Catholic schools received reprieves from impending closings and mergers, hundreds of students will be affected by Catholic school restructuring this September.</p>


  • Candy Culture: Cashing in on Halloween

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    According to the National Retail Federation, the average American will spend $66.28 on Halloween this year. Second only to costumes, candy eats up the largest chunk of this budget with American families spending an average of $22 each Halloween on confections.


  • Saying More than Just ‘No’ to Children This Christmas

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    Out of economic necessity, many parents will have to say ‘no’ to their child this Christmas. Sally Black, Ph.D., assistant professor in health services at Saint Joseph’s University, warns parents to do more than just say ‘no.’

    Parents will need to discuss the reasons why holiday spending will be different this year, Black suggests. “Teach kids about the economy,” she says, “but maintain an optimistic attitude.”


  • ‘A Christmas Carol:’ It’s Still the Pure of Heart That Matter

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    From the classic 1951 Scrooge with Alastair Sim, to the 1992 The Muppet Christmas Carol, to Disney’s 2009 3-D adaptation starring Jim Carrey, which opened at number one the first weekend in November, Dickens’ beloved A Christmas Carol has been in constant reproduction following its original 1843 publication. Generation after generation has sought to adapt the tale not only for film, but theatre, television, ballet, radio and opera.


  • Career Options In Sports Expand as Industry Grows

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    When thinking about the sports industry, what typically comes to mind are the privileged few who have broken into the business as a professional athlete or a member of a prominent major-league front office. For many, a career similar to this is nothing more than a distant dream.


  • Preview Ads Dominate Water Cooler Discussion Before Big Game

    [field_news_date]

    A handful of Super Bowl commercials have already been released online, with more to come in the next few days. This is all part of a growing trend by advertisers to pre-release commercials to build social media buzz and drive consumers to channels devoted to the product.

    “It’s like opening your Christmas presents on Christmas Eve,” says David Allan, Ph.D., associate professor of marketing at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia.


  • Health Care Reform and Medicare Recipients

    [field_news_date]

    From the time presidential candidate Theodore Roosevelt first discussed health care reform in 1912, the topic has been a precedent-setting issue in the U.S. The 2010 passage of health care legislation is no different, but has many Americans in a quandary about how it will affect them. This is especially true of senior citizens.


  • Occupy Wall Street: Crowd Action as American Tradition

    [field_news_date]

    On Oct. 6, a group of Philadelphians gathered at Dilworth Plaza by City Hall in the name of Occupy Philadelphia. The demonstration was organized in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street, which began in September and has since gone national. Jeffrey Hyson, Ph.D., assistant professor of history and director of the American studies program at Saint Joseph’s University, says that historically, a key component of revolution is the action of crowds taking to the streets.


  • Should NCAA Tournament Brackets Drive Employers Mad?

    [field_news_date]

    As NCAA basketball fans begin to research ESPN for information that could prove useful for their brackets – many on company time – employers are voicing concerns that the madness surrounding bracketology will cause declines in productivity. But Claire Simmers Ph.D., chair and professor of management at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, believes that if handled correctly, office pools are useful for boosting morale, as long as productivity is balanced.


  • A World Championship for Philly: A City of 'Winners'

    [field_news_date]

    Philadelphia has been a frustrated city for a long time. The city's professional sports teams stir up passion like little else, but Philadelphians had experienced a dearth of championships and a large dose of frustration over so many seasons…until clinching the 2008 World Series this past October. So the question begs: will the City of Brotherly Love, which has a reputation for being anything but, buck its inferiority complex and shower the Phillies with love this spring?


  • Beyond the Perfect Present: Making the Holidays Meaningful

    [field_news_date]

    No matter our religious or cultural background, we have all felt pressured during the winter season to frame a picture-perfect holiday experience.  Whether it is to serve a flawless Thanksgiving dinner, create a Martha Stewart-inspired holiday home or to give (or receive) a much-desired gift, many feel a stressful frenzy ascending as the leaves continue to fall and the temperature drops.


  • Decoding the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act

    [field_news_date]

    On Nov. 21, 2009, Americans with a genetic medical condition will no longer live in fear of discrimination from their employers because of their unique genetic code. On that date, The Genetic Information Nondiscrimation Act (GINA) goes into effect, prohibiting employers from discriminating in terms of hiring, promotion, firing or any other terms and conditions of employment based on an individual’s genetic code.


  • ADHD: Diagnosis Doesn’t Always Mean Disability

    [field_news_date]

    Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is one of the most prevalent mental disorders among American adults, with 50 percent of childhood cases persisting into adulthood.


  • Love on the Air: ‘The Bachelor’s’ Medieval Romantic Roots

    [field_news_date]

    The music swells as a luxury limo whirrs up to an exotic location at dusk. A beautiful woman emerges from the vehicle and is met by many hopeful, dashing suitors who will vie for her hand in marriage. The winner will be chosen on the season finale, but along the way there will be sun-drenched, sparkling days and romantic, moonlit nights that will alternately thrill or disappoint the contestants and their audience.


  • In History Classes, the Play is the Thing

    [field_news_date]

    This fall, Jeffrey Hyson, Ph.D., assistant professor of history at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, will transform his freshman Western Civilization I classes into fascinating games. Hyson will use an innovative pedagogy developed at Barnard College called Reacting to the Past (RTTP).


  • Non-profits Should Network to Survive Economy During Holidays

    [field_news_date]

    Purse strings are tightening for individuals and corporations alike this holiday season, and donations may be the first to be cut from holiday budgets. Non-profit organizations should take steps to ensure they stay afloat during the current economic recession, says Ray Sarnacki, visiting assistant professor of management at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia.


  • Naughty Or Nice? Online Shopping at Work

    [field_news_date]

    Cyber Monday and the Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays of online shopping that follow can be frustrating — and expensive — for some employers. But Claire Simmers, Ph.D., co-author of "The Internet and Workplace Transformation," says she has seen a recent shift in corporate attitudes concerning employees who shop online at work.


  • Autism Field Needs More Unity and Compassion

    [field_news_date]

    No one can argue that autism is getting more attention than it did 10 years ago. But considering that autism is the fastest growing developmental disorder in the United States, research and services for those who need them most struggle to keep up. Add to that all the mixed messages parents and families dealing with a diagnosis receive.


  • From First Lady to President?

    [field_news_date]

    Hillary Clinton's campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination certainly has Americans and the world talking. Her historic move also speaks volumes about the ever-growing role of women in politics. As a former First Lady, does Clinton have some advantages? One Saint Joseph's University historian says yes.


  • Scientists Awaiting the Mutation of H1N1

    [field_news_date]

    Infectious disease experts are awaiting an infinitesimal event of momentous importance: the mutation of the novel H1N1 influenza virus. “The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization are constantly monitoring the virus as it spreads,” says John Tudor, Ph.D., a microbiologist at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, “but there is no way to predict where, when or if mutation will occur.”


  • SJU Professor Puts Martin Luther King's Final Speech in Context

    [field_news_date]

    On April 4th, the 40th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., much attention will likely be paid to his final speech, "I've Been to the Mountaintop." The speech, delivered April 3, 1968 at the Masonic Temple in Memphis to a relatively small crowd of 2,000 people, has since become one of King's most famous.


  • NFL Plays It Safe Again During Super Bowl Halftime

    [field_news_date]

    David Allan, Ph.D., an entertainment marketing expert, says Bruce Springsteen and the E-Street Band’s performance during Super Bowl XLIII’s halftime show was just another example of the NFL playing it safe. “Remember when rock was risky?” asks Allan. “Well now it’s the safest thing to broadcast during Super Bowl halftime, except for country.”


  • What Can Corporate America Learn From the Chilean Miners?

    [field_news_date]

    Leadership is everywhere. Nowhere was this more evident than in the belly of the Chilean mine in the weeks and months following the Aug. 5 collapse.

    “Corporate America has a lot to learn from the Chilean miners,” says Ron Dufresne, Ph.D., assistant professor of management at Saint Joseph’s University who studies leadership. “One critical takeaway from this experience is the power of vulnerability,” he explains. “Leadership happens because of vulnerability.”


  • Can Current Christmas Cinema Match the Holiday Classics?

    [field_news_date]

    As the public flips its calendars from October to November, December remains only one thin calendar page away, which means movie studios begin rolling out their holiday releases within the next several weeks. The question of whether or not these new Yuletide pictures will ever match up to the classics of old remains to be seen, but some films have a better chance than others, based on a number of factors.


  • This St. Patrick’s Day, Discover Hidden Irish Literary Gems

    [field_news_date]

    With shamrocks hung on doors and parade plans in the works, March is full of all things St. Patrick’s Day. Along with the festivities comes a curiosity about the culture they represent. A good way to get acquainted with the Irish is to pick up a novel by one of the island nation’s gifted authors.


  • Georgian-Russian Conflict: Redrawing the Map?

    [field_news_date]

    Last month, as Russian tanks rolled into South Ossetia – a small, breakaway region of Georgia located in the Caucasus Mountains – people around the globe were jolted into troubling memories of Soviet-era aggression. The Russians were reacting to the actions of Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili, who ordered his troops into South Ossetia, which had fought for its independence from Georgia in the early 1990s.


  • Grapes of Wealth: Local Wineries are Boosting the Economy

    [field_news_date]

    In an economic climate where many small businesses are struggling to survive, local wineries are experiencing a relative boom. “There are wineries in all 50 states,” says Nancy Childs, Ph.D., professor of food marketing at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia. “Nationally, there has been a huge resurgence in viewing local wineries as an artisan craft. It parallels the movement of microbreweries.”


  • A Special Time in Philadelphia Baseball History

    [field_news_date]

    As the Philadelphia Phillies play the San Francisco Giants for the National League Championship Series title, the team is already making baseball history.


  • Philadelphia's Expectations for Great Change

    [field_news_date]

    The New Year always brings change – even if it is just the annual modification of the year in our check registers. But last November, Philadelphians voted for a major transformation when they elected Michael A. Nutter as mayor, signaling they were no longer satisfied with city government's seeming acceptance of a dangerous status quo, and that they expect much more than a date change with the start of his administration.


  • Four-Day Work Week Saves Money, But at What Cost?

    [field_news_date]

    With operating costs rising, employers around the country are entertaining the advantages of a four-day work week. Proponents of the abbreviated schedule boast benefits of cost savings, easier commutes, increased leisure time, and its viability as an alternative to layoffs. So why isn’t this trend becoming widespread?


  • Gambling on the Big Game: The Risk of Concussions

    [field_news_date]

    A previous study of ex-NFL players showed that the damage caused by concussions occurs in the same region of the brain as damage caused by Alzheimer’s disease, resulting in increased concern over post-concussion related injuries and trauma of athletes.


  • Christmas Trees and the Environment: Greening the Options

    [field_news_date]

    It’s that holiday time of year again, and many people shopping for Christmas trees are facing a perennial question: which is the greener choice – real or fake? Climate change expert Clint Springer, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, says that while he prefers real trees because of their environmental benefits, consumers who buy artificial trees can find other ways to “green” their holidays.


  • Increasing Demand for Fair Trade Challenges Organizations

    [field_news_date]

    The premise is simple: to receive a fair wage for hard work. The fair trade movement, which began shortly after the Cold War, has regained momentum recently. A 2008 Fair Trade Federation Interim Report stated there was a 102 percent growth in U.S. and Canadian sales for Fair Trade products between 2004 and 2006.


  • The Fed Gets Creative in Recession-Proofing the Economy

    [field_news_date]

    With the economy fast becoming the number one issue in voters’ minds this election season and the Bear Stearns takeover sending shockwaves through Wall Street, the word recession is making its way from the business pages to everyday conversations.


  • What If Your Child’s the Bully?

    [field_news_date]

    No parent wants to learn that their child is being bullied. But it may be even harder to hear that their child is the bully. What does a parent do when they’re told?

    “Take a deep breath and don’t panic,” advises Sally Kuykendall, Ph.D., assistant professor of health services at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia. “Resist the temptation to respond defensively with ‘not my child.’ Understand that your child may be testing behaviors.”


  • Will Holiday Shoppers Spend More on Food Than Gifts?

    [field_news_date]

    Whether your holiday tradition involves a buffet brunch or a sit-down dinner with seven fishes, abundant amounts of food will be featured. And with the cost of food outpacing the rate of inflation over the past year, entertaining your crowd will be pricey.


  • To Avoid Spreading Germs, Expert Recommends Hand Washing

    [field_news_date]

    Fears of contracting the H1N1 virus this flu season have people steering clear of strangers with coughs and scolding friends who don’t sneeze into their crooked elbows. With everyone trying to stay germ free, hand sanitizer has become a popular means of protection. But although a quick pump from a Purell dispenser is the most convenient form of hand cleaning, is it the best?


  • The Effect of Mergers on Big Pharma

    [field_news_date]

    To cope with projected revenue loss due to increased FDA regulation and blockbuster drugs going off-patent, pharmaceutical companies have consolidated significantly over the past five years. Organizations like Pfizer/Wyeth, Merck/Schering Plough, and Schering Plough/Organon BioSciences have merged forces to improve efficiencies and increase the number of drugs brought to market.


  • Stylish Swag for Cost-Conscious Consumers

    [field_news_date]

    Mark your calendar for September 9. That's the day when customers nationwide will flock to their local Kohl's department store to buy clothing, shoes, and accessories by — Vera Wang?

    While her name may be more commonly associated with Oscar gowns and fashion show runways in Milan, Wang is just the latest in a flurry of high-end designers who are marketing their wares to customers who want to be in style and out-of-debt.


  • That’s Gross: Uncovering the Creepy and Crawly

    [field_news_date]

    Everyone knows this popular Halloween game: turn out the lights, pass around a dried apricot and it’s easy to believe it’s a human earlobe. Peel some grapes and in the dark they feel just like human eyeballs. It’s a game that tricks the senses and it’s something Saint Joseph’s University psychologist Alex Skolnick, Ph.D., has been doing in his lab for the last several years.


  • The State of our Economy: What Americans Can Do

    [field_news_date]

    The economy is a topic on everyone's mind and Americans are frustrated that the problem cannot be fixed overnight. With experts, political candidates and journalists weighing in on the issue, many varied opinions are in the forefront of the media.

    Christopher Coyne, Ph.D., associate professor of finance at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia, thinks the best response is to not panic about the state of our economy.


  • Citizen Journalists: An Inside Look at World Events

    [field_news_date]

    On March 19, media outlets across the globe reported the death of Mohammad Nabbous, the Libyan citizen-journalist responsible for founding Libya Alhurra TV, an independent Internet TV station set up to broadcast raw footage from Benghazi following the Feb. 17 uprising.


  • How Has Facebook Affected Employment Law?

    [field_news_date]

    Employers are tripping over legal hurdles as more companies and their workers use social media tools like Twitter and Facebook.

    The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) is considering a case that explores whether a medical-transportation company illegally fired an employee after she criticized her boss on Facebook.


  • Making Halloween Healthier

    [field_news_date]

    At Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia, Joseph Cifelli, Ed.D., assistant professor of science education, recently surveyed his undergraduate students about their preferences in Halloween treats. Reese's Peanut Butter Cups was the hands down most popular choice, followed by Snickers, Swedish Fish, Twix and Skittles. "It's clear that our students reflect the national consumer trend and candy is still the number one Halloween treat," says Dr. Cifelli.


  • Myths About Health Care Reform Leave Seniors in the Dark

    [field_news_date]

    The rumors swirling about health care reform are as sizeable as the 1,000 pages of proposed legislation. Of particular concern to George P. Sillup, Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmaceutical marketing at Saint Joseph’s University, is the misinformation floating across the Internet, and over the airways, about how health care reform will affect Medicare.


  • Money Matters: Funds Key to MLB Success

    [field_news_date]

    In a world of perfect competitive balance, all 30 Major League Baseball clubs would have an equal chance at playoff baseball. While that thought is nice, it’s not reality. Teams like the Chicago Cubs, a team without a World Championship since 1908, and the Pittsburgh Pirates, who finished below .500 for the 19th straight season, make that evident.


  • An “Intelligent” Approach for Strapped Businesses

    [field_news_date]

    With tight budgets and economic uncertainty, departments in corporations nationwide are becoming more accountable for measurement.


  • A Brave New World for Bullying

    [field_news_date]

    While the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control recently announced that Internet bullying has increased by 50 percent, the reality is that Internet bullying is still relatively less common than other forms of bullying, according to Sally Black, Ph.D., an assistant professor of health services at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia, who studies bullying. She cites name-calling, exclusion and physical abuse as more common forms.


  • At the Heart of Haiti, a Faith that Carries On

    [field_news_date]

    In times of crisis, every thought and action becomes a means of answering a basic question: “How will I survive?”

    When the 7.0-magnitude earthquake devastated Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and its environs, many nations offered help – sending water, funds and manpower – slowly helping to answer this question for the people affected. Yet it may well be a resource the Haitian people possess within themselves that gets them through the greater turmoil: an unwavering, unquestioning faith.


  • U.S. Trade Deficit Shakes Consumer Confidence

    [field_news_date]

    As the U.S. and European economies destabilize under the pressure of debt, the global economy is leaning heavily on China.

    “Consumers — historically and especially during times of economic decline — value price over quality,” says Karen Hogan, Ph.D., professor of finance. “China offers the U.S. and European economies cheap labor and affordable imports; we’re hooked on it.”


  • Office Gossip Can Get You in Legal Trouble

    [field_news_date]

    Office workers are well aware that gossip is an inevitable reality of the workplace. "She did what?" "He said that to the CEO?" While some gossip is relatively harmless, other forms can be damaging to the target and even result in a criminal complaint.


  • Retelling 'Jane Eyre:' A Modern Y.A. Story

    [field_news_date]

    Young adult (y.a.) fiction is a huge market in the publishing industry. According to the Association of American Publishers, paperbound book sales in children’s and y.a. titles topped $1.5 billion in 2009. But while these books are usually written for readers between the ages of 14 and 21, they also have immense crossover appeal to older audiences, says April Lindner, Ph.D., associate professor of English at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, Pa.


  • St. Valentine's Day Lost in Consumerism

    [field_news_date]

    Amidst the hectic scrambling for dinner reservations and artfully prepared floral decorations for Valentine's Day, it's unlikely that one may stop to think about who St. Valentine was or why his feast day is celebrated with red-heart gift cards and plush teddy bears.


  • Landing a Job After College: The Four-Year Plan

    [field_news_date]

    Most college students avoid thinking about the real world until at least their junior year, putting off that visit to the campus career center as long as possible. According to Matthew Brink of Saint Joseph’s University’s Career Development Center, sometimes it’s the waiting that can make the task overwhelming.


  • Happy 200th Birthday, Charles Darwin

    [field_news_date]

    Charles Robert Darwin was born into a genteel family in Shropshire, England, on February 12, 1809. Scientists from around the globe will celebrate the bicentennial of his birth, as well as the 150th anniversary of his monumental work, On the Origin of Species on or about February 12, 2009.


  • Faculty Compete with Classroom Cell Phone and Laptop Use

    [field_news_date]

    Once upon a time, bored students in classrooms distracted themselves with note-passing and whispering. Thanks to increasing wireless capabilities and the expanse of cell phone usage, however, today's students can cure their boredom with text messaging and recreationally surfing the Internet, providing an infinite amount of material from which to distract themselves from their classroom work.


  • How Many More Species Will Go the Way of the Dinosaur?

    [field_news_date]

    According to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), which is the oldest and largest global environmental network, governments have failed to meet targets to reduce the rate of biodiversity loss by 2010. Their recent message says we are now witnessing the greatest extinction crisis since dinosaurs disappeared from our planet 65 million years ago.


  • How Consumers Can Cope with Growing Food Prices

    [field_news_date]

    The current economy is putting a strain on everybody’s pocketbook and food is no exception. You don’t need to watch the evening news to know that food prices are rising faster than the average; just walk down the supermarket aisle.

    John Stanton, Ph.D., chair of food marketing at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, offers ten things you can do to reduce the cost of your food bill while still eating well and not taking too much time.


  • Inaccuracy and Bias: The Delicate Science of Polling

    [field_news_date]

    A recent post-election analysis by Nate Silver in his FiveThirtyEight blog measured the accuracy of polls leading up to midterm elections. His findings indicated not only inaccuracies from a number of polling organizations, but bias in their predictions. What causes these statistical slipups and polling prejudices? Is it the result of bias in polling organizations or an expected reality of predictive polling?


  • Shopping for a Cause: Altruism Sells this Season

    [field_news_date]

    The holidays bring many motivations to buy, buy, buy. Beyond the sale prices and must-have items is something greater for consumers to consider, says Saint Joseph’s University sociologist Keith Brown, Ph.D.

    “Many consumers sincerely want to make a difference in the world through shopping,” he says. “Consumers like to give gifts that have a story about where the product came from, who made it and how the producer benefitted by selling the object.”


  • Endangered Species: America's Heartland

    [field_news_date]

    According to Saint Joseph’s University sociologist Maria Kefalas, Ph.D., the heartland of America’s greatest export is no longer corn and wheat, but rather its young and talented people.

    With one out of every five Americans still living in non-metropolitan areas, and considering that those areas now face natural decline with more deaths than births, the problem of the youth exodus from rural America is one that simply cannot be ignored.


  • Conflicting Messages on What to Eat When You’re Expecting

    [field_news_date]

    Pregnant women often receive conflicting messages about what foods to avoid during their pregnancies. One of the most confusing health messages for women is the recommended guidelines for eating fish. In fact, conflicting reports about safe levels of mercury in fish have a majority of pregnant women eliminating the food from their diet altogether.


  • Lunchroom Nutrition: What's Your School's Calorie Quotient?

    [field_news_date]

    Children obtain about one-third or more of their daily energy requirement from their school meals, and they should expend about 50 percent of their daily energy expenditure while at school. So how's your child's school doing?


  • Predicting Changes in Television Programming and Advertising

    [field_news_date]

    As television season premieres make their debuts this fall, experts predict major changes in programming in the near future.

    Nowadays, viewers can DVR, TiVo, live stream or use onDemand to catch their favorite shows via a variety of mediums. Entertainment is available at the audience’s fingertips - on televisions, computers, iPods and Smartphones - and will continue to change with the technology.


  • Food Industry Lacks Understanding of Organic Consumers

    [field_news_date]

    A food marketing researcher from Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia is learning more about consumer attitudes toward organic foods and exploring their influence on U.S. Markets.


  • Tax Advice: File Now or Pay for it Later

    [field_news_date]

    As April approaches, many citizens begin to dread the hassle of tax season. While major reforms are out of the taxpayer’s control, staying informed and using a tax preparation service are two simple ways to make filing your taxes as stress-free as can be.


  • Brand References and Music Videos

    [field_news_date]

    In recent years, marketers have begun to integrate product placement into popular TV shows, video games, movies and music. While many of these subtle advertising opportunities are the collaborative work of producers and marketers, it is sometimes the work of the artists themselves.


  • For Winter Sales, Marketers Get Creative

    [field_news_date]

    Holiday shoppers across the nation have begun their yearly purchase-frenzy, but even with events like Black Friday and Cyber Monday driving sales, preliminary studies have shown that consumers plan to spend only as much as they did last year. Facing a predicted flat line in profits rather than the increase retailers prefer, marketers for many well-known companies are taking non-traditional routes to bring in business.


  • The Economic Status: Ascending from Rock Bottom

    [field_news_date]

    American consumers are worried: They want to know whether their economy is improving, worsening or unchanging. Ben Liebman, Ph.D., associate professor of economics at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, says economists will look to holiday spending to gauge the economy’s health.


  • Will Denver's '08 DNC Prove as Unconventional as Chicago '68?

    [field_news_date]

    A Democratic convention during an unpopular war in the last months of an even more unpopular presidency: Chicago, 1968? Try Denver, 2008! But will denizens of the Rocky Mountain state be driven to sip from politically incorrect water bottles because of psychedelic substances lacing their pristine reservoirs? Not likely, says Katherine Sibley, Ph.D., chair and professor of history at Saint Joseph’s University.


  • Educating Socially Engaged Environmental Scientists

    [field_news_date]

    This year, Earth Day falls on April 22, and for its 39th anniversary, the eco-minded among us will be taking stock of advancements made by the green movement, as well as the challenges that remain.


  • From Stormwater to Sustainability

    [field_news_date]

    Significant areas of the country have experienced heavy rains this year, leaving government officials to grapple with the problem of how to safely handle excess stormwater. In the Philadelphia area, for instance, with two months left to measure, the 2011 rainfall total is within one half-inch of its record 56.45 inches.


  • Homeland Security: A Personal Call to Action

    [field_news_date]

    Most Americans leave homeland security efforts to government officials and emergency responders. Paul Andrews, adjunct professor for Saint Joseph's University’s Criminal Justice and Public Safety Institute and a nationally recognized expert in homeland security, has a different view. He suggests individuals must do their own part in protecting our country.


  • USDA Serves a Dinner Plate for Healthy Eating

    [field_news_date]

    America is about to ditch the food pyramid. In its place, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) will serve a plate-shaped symbol sliced into basic food groups. Beside the plate will rest a small cup of dairy (milk or yogurt). What this means for the kid on the playground, or the mom running in eight different directions, is that each will now have an easier guideline to follow for healthy eating.


  • Sleeping Your Way to a Better School Year

    [field_news_date]

    As the long, lazy days of summer come to an end, kids will complain about earlier bedtimes in addition to going back to school. The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) is urging parents to begin gradually changing kids' sleep patterns and easing them into school year bedtimes.


  • At School, It’s Easy Being Green

    [field_news_date]

    For Kermit the Frog, being green is a burden. But according to Michael McCann, Ph.D., professor of biology and associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, being green can be easier than it seems for America’s students.

    McCann’s suggestions begin with transportation. He says the most carbon-free way to travel is walking or biking.


  • Will a Recession Find the Class of 2008 Serving French Fries?

    [field_news_date]

    Even with President Bush's recent claim that the U.S. is not heading toward a recession, college students remain concerned with the status of a downturn in the economy and what effect it could have on the future job market. Career specialists, however, say that the Class of 2008 should not fret about securing employment.


  • Connecting with the Great Depression?

    [field_news_date]

    Political leaders, economic analysts and journalists are comparing the current financial meltdown to the Great Depression. “Worst Crisis Since the ’30s, With No End Yet in Sight” was a recent baleful headline from The Wall Street Journal.


  • To Negotiate or to Retaliate: Conflict Resoution in Russia

    [field_news_date]

    Many observers of the recent suicide bombing at Moscow’s Domodedovo airport were surprised that despite the carnage, the airport remained open for business. While some claimed that this response was an example of Russian toughness and stoicism in the face of a crisis, Lisa Baglione, Ph.D., chair and professor of political science at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, believes that something else was at work.


  • Hello Boss…I'm Sick

    [field_news_date]

    Preparing for the holiday season is a marathon these days, with Americans testing their endurance beginning in November and crossing the finish line around mid-January. Given that most companies work in a global environment which operates 24/7, employees are challenged to find time to get everything accomplished.


  • Health Care Reform’s Elephant in the Room

    [field_news_date]

    There may not be a simple solution to the complex problem of reforming health care, but bioethicist Mark Aita, S.J., M.D., assistant director of the Institute for Catholic Bioethics at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, is certain of one thing – the elephant in the room that no one wants to discuss is that insured Americans contribute to the problem.


  • West Meets East for 2008 Olympics

    [field_news_date]

    The 2008 Olympics present both opportunity and challenge for hosting nation China, namely in the area of tourism, says Brent Smith, Ph.D., assistant professor of marketing at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia.

    “China, like much of East Asia, remains very foreign to most Westerners, especially from the United States,” he says. “Visitors to its larger cities, such as Beijing, are usually impressed by what they’d not expected to see.”


  • What’s Behind China’s Religious Resurgence?

    [field_news_date]

    The vast populace of China is experiencing a new purchasing power fueled by changing economic policies. Meanwhile, China watchers are reporting another lifestyle shift in the world’s third largest country: the resurgence of organized religion.


  • Let This Holiday Season Jumpstart New Meal Traditions

    [field_news_date]

    The quintessential holiday scene – if not children eagerly unwrapping presents from under the Christmas tree – normally involves a family gathered around a table covered with home-cooked food.  The reality is that, for the rest of the year, families don't routinely convene during mealtimes.


  • Pepsi Ends Longtime Tradition of Super Bowl Ads

    [field_news_date]

    David Allan, Ph.D., an entertainment marketing expert and professor at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, says the big news this year about Super Bowl commercials is what viewers won’t see.

    Pepsi, which has bought up commercial slots during the Super Bowl for more than 20 years, has opted out this time around, leaving the field open for other companies to make their move.


  • Holding Adults Responsible for School Bullying

    [field_news_date]

    As students head back to school this fall, many of them will encounter name-calling, putdowns or malicious rumors from other students. In order to control bullying, Pennsylvania is requiring anti-bullying policies in all schools by next year.  Sally Black, Ph.D., bullying prevention expert, says policies against bullying are not enough. Holding adults accountable is the key to protecting children.


  • Gray Wolves, Grizzly Bears and Bald Eagles

    [field_news_date]

    2007 has been a big year for removal of protected animals from the endangered species list. Three species native to North America that were among the first to be listed after the passage of the Endangered Species Preservation Act of 1966 have been recovered and no longer need protection. In February, Canis lupus was delisted in certain areas of its range; in March, Ursus arctos horribilis was delisted; in July Haliaeetus leucocephalus was delisted, making headlines.


  • Hi, I’m Your New Roommate!

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    For many first-year college students, it may be the first time they have had to share a room with another person. It can be an exciting, but at times trying experience, says Marci Berney, an associate director in the office of Residence Life at Saint Joseph’s University.


  • Dangers of Spring Break Partying

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    For college students, spring break is traditionally a time of carefree escapades in tropical locales with plenty of good times, relaxation and, of course, alcohol. George Dowdall, Ph.D., and Raquel Kennedy Bergen, Ph.D., both professors of sociology at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia, offer tips to college students on how to stay safe.


  • The Way We Vote Has Changed

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    No one can deny that this year’s election proved to be historic, transformational and unforgettable. But while many are focusing on race and the breaking of barriers, Graham Lee, Ph.D., professor of political science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia, is talking about the changes he’s observed in voting trends.


  • The Danger Behind the Decline of Newspapers

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    Considering all the layoffs, downsizes and cutbacks reported in the news these days, it's not surprising to learn that the news itself is being cut back.

    According to Joe Samuel Starnes, visiting assistant professor of English at Saint Joseph's University, "You don't have to look far to see struggling businesses, but newspapers have been going down for a while because of the loss of advertising revenue and readership."


  • Once Provocative, Madonna is Now ‘Safe Choice’ for NFL

    [field_news_date]

    It’s been confirmed: Madonna will be playing the halftime show at Super Bowl XLVI. “Once provocative and now preserved, Madonna has been added to a list of acts considered safe by the NFL since the 2004 wardrobe malfunction,” says entertainment marketing expert David Allan, Ph.D. While she has earned her place in history as a mega pop-star icon, Allan questions whom the NFL is trying to reach with this halftime act.


  • Searching for Answers: Google's Presence in China

    [field_news_date]

    When Jim Caccamo, Ph.D., an expert in computing and telecommunications technology ethics, heard of Google’s recent struggles in China, he knew he’d need to update the curriculum for the Technology, Society and Christian Ethics course he teaches at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia, Pa.


  • Roll Up Your Sleeves and Avoid the Flu

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    October marks the beginning of flu season, and once again, health care professionals are exhorting people to get a flu shot. Microbiologist John Tudor, Ph.D., professor of biology at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, agrees that it’s time to roll up our sleeves and offer up our arms for the vaccination.


  • Five Tips for a Successful Roommate Relationship

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    <p>For many first-year college students, living in a residence hall may be the first time they have to share a room with another person. It can be an exciting, but at times trying experience.</p>


  • What NOT to Bring to College

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    A dorm room is a limited space. So while the flat screen, couch and love seat fit comfortably in the U-Haul, students may encounter challenges cramming all of that stuff into the new dorm.

    Kim Allen-Stuck, Ph.D., is an administrator at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, where she counsels students on practical strategies for adjusting to college life.

    Here are the list of items Allen-Stuck advises students NOT to bring to college this fall:


  • Avoiding The Spread of Infection – In More Ways Than One

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    It's well known that a primary vector of disease is a germ-laden hand. Mano to mano, much misery in the land of the adenovirus is spread from a handshake. So what can you do when a sniffling colleague heads over to greet you at a holiday party?


  • A Beacon of Hope for Hunger Relief in Philadelphia

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    According to a recent census, Philadelphia’s poverty rate is “roughly double” the national figure. The city’s largest hunger-relief organization, Philabundance, estimates that 25.1 percent of Philadelphians are below the poverty line – a rate that is highest among the 10 biggest U.S. cities. To address this issue, a group of Saint Joseph’s University students and faculty partnered with Philabundance to develop a new food distribution model to reach Philadelphia’s hungry more efficiently.


  • How So-Called Healthy Foods Can Fool You

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    As America’s collective waistline continues to expand, so does the number of food products parading themselves as healthy options. In light of growing concern over the nutritional value of the foods we put into our bodies, many food marketers have stepped up their advertising in an effort to stand out against their competitors.


  • No Credit Left Behind: To-Dos for Tax Season 2012

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    <p>As April approaches, many citizens begin to dread the hassle of tax season. While major reforms are out of the taxpayer&rsquo;s control, staying informed and using a tax preparation service are two simple ways to make filing your taxes as stress-free as can be.</p>