Student Life

Sexual Misconduct & Violence: Support & Resources

Frequently Asked Questions

Below are answers to some frequently asked questions about sexual violence.

Q. If I am the victim of a sexual assault, will other people find out what happened to me?

A. If you speak with one of the confidential resources, listed on this site, and are 18 years of age or older, it will remain confidential. If you disclose or report the assault to another University employee, they may need to report this information to other University officials, such as SJU Public Safety but information will remain as private and limited as possible.

 

Q. If some time has passed since a sexual assault, where can a victim receive medical care?

A. Non-urgent follow-up care can be obtained at the SJU Student Health Center (located in Sourin Hall), a Primary Care Physician’s office or a clinic.  Physical forensic evidence can be collected up to 96 hours after and assault.  

 

Q. Who can I talk with confidentially on campus?

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) is available to offer confidential support for students.   

For the safety of the whole SJU community, others on campus may be required by law to report known instances of sexual violence to the Office of Public Safety or the University Title IX Coordinator.  When an instance of sexual violence is reported, all efforts are made to keep the identity of the victim private and all follow-up is handled in a very sensitive manner. 

 

Q. Will my parents be contacted if I am a victim of assault?

SJU encourages all students to speak with parents and family as a source of support, especially following a significant personal incident, such as an instance of sexual violence.  However, if a student is over the age of 18, SJU will not contact parents, provided that there are no medical concerns or injuries that require parental notification. 

 

Q. If the perpetrator is not an SJU student, can the University still help?

Yes. Here at SJU, our first priority is the safety of all students.  SJU can assist in many ways, even if the perpetrator is not an SJU student.  Some examples of how SJU can help include assisting students to receive appropriate medical care, coordinating reporting and follow-up with local police, issuing campus bans and providing support during off-campus procedures such as court appearances.

 

Q. What if I was intoxicated when I was assaulted?

The use of alcohol and/or drugs does not make the complainant at fault for sexual violence. Someone under the influence of alcohol or drugs cannot give consent.  Furthermore, no student should hesitate to report an instance of sexual assault for fear of getting in trouble for alcohol use.  At SJU we are concerned for the safety and wellbeing of all students and our first priority is to help students to receive necessary support.  

 

Q. What is a Title IX Coordinator?

At SJU, the Title IX Coordinator is Dr. Mary-Elaine Perry (Campion 239, 610-660-1145, titleIX@sju.edu.)  In this role, she can assist students in filing a report of harassment or assault and can connect students to appropriate resources.  She also works with the appropriate offices on campus to ensure that all issues of sexual violence and harassment are properly handled to keep students and the campus community safe.