Course Descriptions

CRJ 622 Basic Principles of Behavior Analysis (3 credits)

Learning serves as the basis for behavior change. In the field of criminal justice, programs often attempt to rehabilitate delinquents and offenders.  This course covers the basic principles of behavior and begins to address their application to problems faced by people and society.  The course begins with an introduction to a system of principles that account for acquisition and maintenance of both typical and problematic or challenging behavior.  Building upon this, the principles are illustrated with examples of application for both human (applied research) and non-human populations (basic research).  Basic research (derived from animal learning studies) is included when relevant to understanding concepts.  The basics for Pavlovian or respondent conditioning are reviewed, emphasizing both traditional research and application in such clinical phenomena as drug addiction.  The conclusion of the course is concerned with verbal behavior in typical human interactions.

CRJ 623 Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)

Often criminal justice personnel are called to function as behavior managers. To function effectively as a behavior manager or behavior analyst, criminal justice personnel require knowledge of the basic concepts of human behavior and procedures for change. This course covers the practical aspects of being an applied behavior analyst working in the criminal justice system, school system and the community setting.  Working in the community with offenders and offender prevention often requires taking the scientific principles of human behavior (behavior analysis) and applying those principles to the socialization of children at risk for delinquency and conduct problems (such as those with serious emotional disturbance and social maladjustment- i.e., conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and attention deficit disorder). This course presents the salient concepts of applied behavior analysis and guides the student through the process of creating a behavior intervention plan that will utilize these applied principles.

CRJ 624 Behavior Analysis and Consultation (3 credits)

Professionals in the field of criminal justice often serve as consultants. Consultation has become a major approach to service delivery of psycho-educational services to children and adolescents. This course focuses on behavioral consultation in the juvenile justice system, school system, workplace, and community settings. The topics covered are best practices in behavioral consultation, the verbal behavior of the consultant and the consultee, building a consulting relationship, problem identification interviewing, direct observation methodology, problem analysis interviewing, skills and functional behavioral assessment methodology, functional analysis, standardized behavioral assessment, positive behavioral support and developing a competing behaviors model, treatment plan design and implementation, and treatment evaluation using single subject designs and graphical analysis of the data.

CRJ 625 Behavioral Development (3 credits)

Many people in the justice system today are there as a result of underlying emotional and behavioral disorders. Conceptualization of behavior problems and the origins of behavioral disorders are critical to the functioning of a criminal justice professional. This course focuses on basic principles in behavior analysis and its role in both typical and atypical development of children. Areas of focus include language delays, motor developmental delays, conduct and oppositional defiant disorder, childhood depression and autism spectrum disorders. The course reviews field applications including observations, functional behavioral assessment, curriculum-based measures and intervention strategies that involve both the school and the family.

CRJ 626 Clinical Behavior Analysis (3 credits)

This course applies behavior analysis to the realm of face-to-face talk therapy, and is designed to provide an overview of behavior analytic concepts, functional analysis, behavioral case formulation, and behaviorally-based interventions for a variety of clinical concerns. This course reviews basic principles of behavior analysis, including operant behavior, satiation, deprivation, modeling, chaining, stimulus control, reinforcement, contingency management, and rule-governed behavior. Learners participating in this course will also learn about functional analytic case formulation and the processes of behavior therapy and counseling. 

CRJ 790 Internship in Behavior Analysis I (3 credits)

This course is offered in partial fulfillment of the university-affiliated intensive practicum component of a field experience in the field of applied behavior analysis, and encompasses the academic portion of the experience. Field experience is based on 300 contact hours. Such work must be preceded by a proposal that must be approved by the Director of the Graduate Criminal Justice program.

CRJ 791 Internship in Behavior Analysis II (3 credits)

This course is offered in partial fulfillment of the university-affiliated intensive practicum component of a field experience in the field of applied behavior analysis, and encompasses the academic portion of the experience. Field experience is based on 300 contact hours. Such work must be preceded by a proposal that must be approved by the Director of the Graduate Criminal Justice program.  Prerequisite: CRJ 790.

CRJ 792 Internship in Behavior Analysis III (3 credits)

This course is offered in partial fulfillment of the university-affiliated intensive practicum component of a field experience in the field of applied behavior analysis, and encompasses the academic portion of the experience. Field experience is based on 150 contact hours. Such work must be preceded by a proposal that must be approved by the Director of the Graduate Criminal Justice program. Prerequisite: CRJ 791

CRJ 657 Ethics and Professional Standards for the Behavior Analyst (3 credits)

This course focuses on the ethical considerations of behavior analytic services for the practicing behavior analyst. One aspect of this course details the Guidelines for Responsible Conduct of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board as well as relevant literature on the topic of ethical behavior in the field. Another aspect of the course focuses on providing “context” to these guidelines, highlighting principles of behavior, and potential applications of these principles that raise ethical issues. Case scenarios are reviewed throughout the course, and issues, which practicing behavior analysts may encounter on the job, are examined. At the conclusion of the course, students are expected to present a case study drawn from their own personal or professional experience. Students will also interview an experienced BCBA regarding their experiences with ethical dilemmas.