Amber Abbas, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Disciplines Taught: Asian Studies, History
Office: Barbelin/Lonergan 112O
Phone: 610-660-1744
Email: aabbas@sju.edu


Dr. Abbas' research focuses on the period of transition associated with the 1947 Independence and Partition of India, and its particular impact on South Asian Muslims. This research considers questions of state, nation and identity building as well as methodological questions about the role of oral history as a source for understanding the past. Dr. Abbas' research confronts questions of meaning and its impact in people's lives. Lately, these interests have encouraged her to expand her work to explore the South Asian Diaspora in the United States. In this work, she works closely with The South Asian American Digital Archive. In addition to dozens of oral interviews with men and women in South Asia, Dr. Abbas has consulted archives in England, Pakistan, India, and Bangladesh.

Education

B.A., Duke University
M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin

Professional Experience

Co-Chair Academic Advisory Board, The South Asian American Digital Archive.

Program Committee, Oral History Association 2015 Conference.

Courses Taught

HIS 154 Forging the Modern World
HIS 356 Modern South Asia
HIS 100 Forging the Modern World
HIS 210  Historical  Introduction to South Asia
HIS 359 India and Pakistan: From Colony to Nation

HIS 478 Oral History, Migration and the Archive

Publications

“The Pedagogy of the Archive: South Asian America in the University Classroom,” The Journal of American Ethnic History, Vol. 33, No. 4 (Summer 2014), 61-66.

“The Solidarity Agenda: Aligarh Students and the Demand for Pakistan,” South Asian History and Culture Special Issue: Defying the Perpetual Exception: Culture and Power in South Asian Islam, Vol. 5, No. 2 (2014): 147-162.

Review of The Aga Khan Case: Religion and Identity in Colonial India by Teena Purohit. Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, Vol. 76, No. 3 (October 2013): 545-547.

“For the Sound of Her Voice,” The Appendix: Out Loud, Vol. 1 No. 3. July 2013.

Review of Dead Reckoning: Memories of the 1971 Bangladesh War by Sarmila Bose. H-Memory, H-Net Reviews. 2011.

Grants and Awards

2014 International Seminar on Decolonization. National History Center funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Washington, DC.

2009 American Institute of Bangladesh Studies Junior Research Fellowship.

2008 Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship.

2008 Critical Language Scholarship for Intensive Language Institutes (Urdu), National Security Language Initiative, United States Department of State.

2007 Jan Carleton Perry Prize for Best Master’s Thesis “Thinking Through Partition: Finishing the Narrative,” Department of History, UT Austin.

1999-2000 Fulbright Full Grant in Pakistan, Institute of International Education, United States Department of State.

Research

Dr.  Abbas’ research focuses on the period of transition associated with the 1947 Independence and Partition of India, and its particular impact on South Asian Muslims. In addition to dozens of oral interviews with men and women in South Asia, Dr. Abbas has consulted archives in England, Pakistan, India, and Bangladesh. Dr. Abbas’ most recent publications are: “For the Sound of Her Voice,” The Appendix: Out Loud, Vol. 1No. 3. July 2013. “The Solidarity Agenda: Aligarh Students and the Demand for Pakistan,” South Asian History and Culture: Special Issue. 

Inspired by her participation in the 2014 International Seminar on Decolonization in Washington, DC, Dr. Abbas is developing a project on the experience of Indian students in the United States before and after Indian independence.

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